Recent growth in world trade has resulted in container ship designs reaching capacity levels exceeding 8,000 TEU, representing a four-fold increase in capacity from the 1970’s to the present. These new larger vessels require port calls at terminals capable of providing deeper drafts, larger cranes and storage capacity. This shift in vessel design and growth of international trade has brought new logistics and congestion problems in and around our major U.S ports

Fifty years ago, the United States developed the Interstate Highway System to move our goods to market, deploy our military assets in time of National Emergency and compliment an established rail system. The development of rail and highway in the United States has been the foundation of our domestic Intermodal system. These two transportation modes continue to deliver products to the American consumer who is largely responsible for powering the global economy today.

Growth in trade has placed a burden on the U.S. transportation infrastructure. Both rail and highway have reached capacity and the cost to expand that capacity is enormous. Logistic companies need an alternative to the current rail and highway system that is capable of complimenting the existing modes and adding needed capacity.

That alternative is SHORT SEA SHIPPING.